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Abstract Cooperation with Japanese private sector and NGOs Ai Namiki ainamiki1121@gmail.com Thank you very much for giving me time in your office the other day. I have just come back to the UK and writing this email. When I was there I visited SRISTI and became more interested in your dynamic activities to promote grassroots innovations in India. The information I gained will be useful for writing my dissertation that will be submitted to the LSE this year. It would be great if you could provide me with some extra-information when required in the future.  I am now more motivated to contribute to expanding your cooperation with the Japanese private sector. So please feel free to contact me if I can contribute to your activities for building partnerships with the Japanese private sector and NGOs. Honey Bee Network welcomes such cooperation Ai and we hope we will have more delegations of Japanese corporations visiting us soon. –Ed. Keep up your volunteering spirit Abhijeet Dhanotiya abhijeet.dhanotiya@spsu.ac.in I am from Mandsaur (MP), and I can devote time to volunteering full time for HBN. Yes I am willing to travel and organise activities for children. I am least interested in desk volunteering; I will do this too if necessary, but I will prefer to work in field activities. Why not organise idea contests among municipal and rural school children, search and spread grassroots innovations, help in setting up innovation clubs in schools and collges, and of ofcourse make a list of socio-technical unmet needs of poor people. –Ed. Finishing project in hand Jayesh M. Sonawane, jsonawane@iitb.ac.in jmson5@student.monash.edu Many thanks for the appreciation award (GYTI) at IIMA, and it was really a wonderful day in my life. From that day, I am inspired to work towards innovations and innovators. I’ll be glad to help your organisation. Please suggest to me how I can get involved in it. At present I am looking for research funds because I don’t have allocated funds at IIT. Definitely I want an incentive for my work for an organisation and that is your blessing. Our blessings are always with you. We hope you’ll successfully complete the project on hand. –Ed. Amazed, inspired and wish to fund innovations Sridhar V sridhar78@gmail.com I recently came across a video on TED wherein Prof. Anil Gupta was addressing a large audience. I was amazed and was emotionally touched by the way simple people in villages or low-income groups deal with day-to-day problems and are able to make such outstanding innovations.  Just to give you a brief background, I am a financial analyst with 10 years of work experience and have done my MBA in Finance.  I live in Bangalore along with my parents and have been involved in providing financial/investment advice, articles as well as blogs through certain websites/portals. I’ve been a participant in the Rangde.org website which enables lending to the poor and reinvesting the returns, which help many people in small occupations to convert their dreams into reality.  I am interested in working with you in some way, which can bring life to such ideas or innovations. Or if there is a possibility of investing a small sum in some technology/innovation for a nominal return, I can try that too (either individually or with a group of other interested people). I might sound like a business or finance person here, but frankly I’m also from the middle class and don’t have so much of resources to donate or freely fund projects. However, after the Rangde experience I believe that people in the countryside are highly enterprising and with sums of Rs.5000-Rs.50,000, they are able to create a regular occupation/business/venture, etc. So I think if likeminded people get together a lot of ideas can come to life.  I am not an innovator or a science geek, but I can understand the importance of social investing to improve the livelihood of people at the bottom of the pyramid.  I have also been involved in lending/investing initiatives, but this one looks more promising, as these are highly innovative ways of solving simple problems.  If you can give me further details about the projects/ideas and how I can participate, it would be helpful.  We have set up a small SRISTI social innovation facility (sif.sristi.org) for technology, education, culture and institutional innovations with huge social impact, preferably in disadvantaged regions and for social segments. Three of us have pooled only Rs.21 lakhs so far, but we will collect small amounts from many and involve them in supporting, mentoring and hand holding the innovators. I recently went to BITS, Pilani, and came across some very interesting ideas such as malaria and TB detection using cell phone-based microscope and algorithm embedded in the cell phone. We need active involvement of not only you but also of your friends. Let us discuss this matter further. –Ed. Global patent regime Manisha Narula adv.manisha2001@gmail.com I am pursuing my doctorate research in “Global Patent Regime and Piracy of Traditional Knowledge of India” from Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab. I came to know about your NGO from various articles. For the purpose of my research, I need the help of your NGO. If possible, can you please suggest to me names of people from your organisation who are monitoring the field of bio piracy, so that I can interview them, as it will be really helpful in my research. We are constantly trying to secure the rights of traditional knowledge holders apart from innovators and file patents for them. Our NIF website has the list of innovators for whom patents have been filed. The scientists at NIF and SSS Lab can help you on the topic. Please go through websites sristi.org and nifindia.org. Moreover we have a programme of internship for students/scholars. You may utilise it. –Ed. A manifesto for new India Kantisen Shroff kantisen@gmail.com Vyakti ,Vichar, Vyavahar and Sanskar – a manifesto for new India. You have given us a vision for the 21st Century. At least we in Kutch feel that as responsible people, we can earnestly put these ideas into action and thus create a small working model. In all appreciation. Warm regards for your blessings, Kanti Kaka. HBN counts on support of senior colleagues like you. –Ed. Focus on ecology, grassroots Julia Kjirk juliathefashonista@gmail.com I am an avid reader, which brought me to the blog on your site, but I’m also an avid writer and I would like to speak to you about contributing an article. We are engaged in supporting innovations at the grassroots. We appreciate ideas related to the area. Pl do send your contributions for our blog. –Ed. Proof of clean water - needs a demo  Efe Ertür efe.ertur@icloud.com My name is Efe Ertur, I am an Industrial Design student in The Hague (NL). Currently I am working with my team on a clean water project for poor Indian communities in cooperation with the Unilever Foundation. We are currently at the end stage of our design challenge and I was wondering if we could run our design concept and ask you for your opinion. We value your experience and were hoping to present our idea to you and receive some feedback, to find out if our concept could actually work for poor communities in India. We’d greatly appreciate your input if you agree to my proposal. We can try, please send your ideas. –Ed. Cast iron kadhai (cooking pats needs to be rediscovered) Rowland Manthorpe rowland.manthorpe@gmail.com I’m a journalist writing a feature for a new magazine that’s going to be published by the innovation charity NESTA, the same organisation which recently brought back The Longitude Prize. The theme of the article is the best old ideas we should bring back to life. What do we lose when things become obsolete? How can we bring them back? What should come back? I’m using trams as a sort of guiding framework: by the 70s/80s trams as an idea seemed completely dead — cities had ripped/or were ripping them all up. Now all the same cities are trying to resurrect their tram systems. I was wondering: what would you bring back in your field, if you could? Is there any “thing” you would bring back? Any ritual or pattern of behaviour? Any useful item or structure that shouldn’t have been lost? I was also interested in the Mitticool fridge. That’s a fantastic example of looking back in a useful rather than a nostalgic way. Was its invention motivated by a sense of history? Is it an example that is possible to follow? Thanks for your help. Thanks for writing to us.  Cast iron cooking vessel is one such thing which I may wish to bring back, if for no other reason than to overcome ever increasing problem of anaemia among women; this was an easy way of meeting daily iron need of people. Will discuss with colleagues and maybe there are more things that we should try to bring back. Mitticool was conceived by Mansukhbhai Prajapati soon after the earthquake when lot of earthen water pots were damaged, stay in touch. –Ed. Indigenous knowledge: What paradox you want resolved? Arun Kumar hiitsmaan@gmail.com I have enrolled for a Ph.D. programme to study “Indigenous Knowledge Management”. I have read a lot about NIF, GIAN, SRISTI, and watched a number of your lectures. So, Sir, please tell me the channels through which you are able to reach the innovators. And suggest me something. I shall be very thankful to you for this. We will be very happy to encourage you to pursue your PhD on the subject you mention. One of the first things one ought to do is to problematise the issue, what is the paradox one wishes to resolve. Have you visited some communities, absorbed the way local knowledge systems work, and then reflect on what you observed: What you saw but did not observe and what you observed without seeing? Your own assumptions are as much an important part of the study as your empirical work. Look forward to hear more after you have engaged with some community for a few days by staying there.We will assign a mentor from our group who could help you in your study after we have more details. –Ed. Indigenous knowledge: Whatparadox you want resolved? ArunKumar hiitsmaan@gmail.com I have enrolled for a Ph.D. programme to study “Indigenous Knowledge Management”.I have read a lot about NIF, GIAN, SRISTI, and watched a number of your lectures. So,Sir, please tell me the channels through which you are able to reach the innovators. And suggest me something. I shall be very thankful to you for this. We will be very happy to encourage you to pursue your PhD on the subject you mention. One of the first things one ought to do is to problematise the issue, what is the paradox one wishes to resolve.Have you visited some communities, absorbed the way local knowledge systems work, and then reflect onwhat you observed:  What you saw but did not observe and what you observed without seeing. Your own assumptions are as muchan important part of the study as your empirical work.Look forward to hear more after you have engaged with some community for a few days by staying there. We will assign a mentor from our group who could help you in your study after we havemore details. –Ed.
 
Volume No. Honey Bee 25(2) 21-22, 2014

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